Keynote Speakers

Jasur Khudoyberdiev

Senior Lecturer Westminster International University in Tashkent (WIUT), Uzbekistan
Creativity in language education and assessment is regarded to be unresearched. The following article casts some lights on some of the latest developments in the area of creativity and how can be taught in the language classrooms. The assessment of creativity and for creativity is also discussed generally. The article concludes that education and assessment without a push for creativity is not a decent education.

Tuychiev Sohibjon Erkinovich

Teacher of Samarkand State Institute of Foreign Languages
In the current time, teacher assessment is dominantly used in the real classroom setting and this brings several problems and concerns in student’s learning. Since teacher is the only who takes in charge of evaluating students’ grades and performances, teacher’s prejudgment and prejudice are mainly concerned. This article deals with the importance of assessment which is now widely used in the actual classroom. The aim of this paper is to clarify the roles of self, peer, and teacher evaluation in the teaching and learning of languages. It also discusses how to incorporate such evaluations into the material production process. The research showed that teacher evaluations are still the most common form of evaluation.

Hakimov Kakhramon Akramovich

Senior teacher of Samarkand state institute of foreign languages
In the current time, teacher assessment is dominantly used in the real classroom setting and this brings several problems and concerns in student’s learning. Since teacher is the only who takes in charge of evaluating students’ grades and performances, teacher’s prejudgment and prejudice are mainly concerned. This article deals with the importance of assessment which is now widely used in the actual classroom. The aim of this paper is to clarify the roles of self, peer, and teacher evaluation in the teaching and learning of languages. It also discusses how to incorporate such evaluations into the material production process. The research showed that teacher evaluations are still the most common form of evaluation.

Ashirbaeva Aytkul Nuralievna

Teacher at TRChSPI in Chirchik
The evaluation of productive and receptive skills was highlighted in the article. There are some strategies that help to ease the process of the assessment of certain types of skills, as every skill demands separate and special attitude.

Andronova E. S

Senior teacher Tashkent Branch of Moscow State University named after M.V.Lomonosov Tashkent, Uzbekistan
The article "Assessment Techniques for ESP students’ reading skills" depicts various types of reading used at ESP lessons as well as the aims and the necessity of using evaluation system for reading skill. As teaching ESP students implies working with texts most of the time of the lesson, the developing students’ reading competence becomes vital. This implies the usage of adequate evaluation system for ESP students’ reading skills. Moreover, based on ESP materials and taking into account certain reading techniques, such as skimming, scanning, intensive or extensive one, a teacher should choose the best way of evaluating students’ foreign language reading competence. Hence, to help teachers in compiling and using appropriate reading tests, some criteria for defining the level of ESP students’ reading competence and task designing are described with the examples of test exercises on the ESP text for psychologists. Methods, described in the article, provide the reader with the information when and how to use assessment materials reached and how far the ESP course was beneficial for them.  Everything touched in the article could be fruitful for other ESP teachers and scholars to implement in their further work with their students.

Saida Akbarova

Ph.D., Lecturer Westminster International University in Tashkent Tashkent, Uzbekistan
Misalignment of instruction and assessment creates many issues for teachers. To address this challenge it is recommended to use the Constructive Alignment model developed by Professor John B. Biggs when designing curriculum. In the presentation, I am going to exemplify Constructive Alignment model used to align learning outcomes, instruction and assessment in Academic English (AE) module. The stages in developing an alignment plan will be shared. Once the alignment model and plan were implemented into AE curriculum design, an effective teaching system was set which enabled teachers to engage their students into meaningful learning, consequently, increasing their motivation to learn.

Aelita Nuritdinova

MA TESL, State rater/examiner, Head of English department Aviation Training center of Uzbekistan Airways Tashkent, Uzbekistan
This paper contains the explanation of the assessment process of the high-stake test for pilots and ATCOS (air traffic controllers) in Uzbekistan. Aviation Training center of Uzbekistan Airways developed and implemented ELPAT (English Language Proficiency Aviation Test) to assess English language proficiency as an integral component to ensure flight safety. The testing system provides opportunities to give valid and reliable assessment in accordance with ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) requirements. The paper demonstrates not only the technology how the assessment conducted but also explains the background of the assessment in aviation and the raters(evaluators).

Inna Abdullayeva

MA in cognitive linguistics, State rater/examiner, Deputy director Aviation Training center of Uzbekistan Airways Tashkent, Uzbekistan
This paper contains the explanation of the assessment process of the high-stake test for pilots and ATCOS (air traffic controllers) in Uzbekistan. Aviation Training center of Uzbekistan Airways developed and implemented ELPAT (English Language Proficiency Aviation Test) to assess English language proficiency as an integral component to ensure flight safety. The testing system provides opportunities to give valid and reliable assessment in accordance with ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) requirements. The paper demonstrates not only the technology how the assessment conducted but also explains the background of the assessment in aviation and the raters(evaluators).

Zaylobidinova Munira

Ferghana State University
There are still challenges in assessment system of higher education in Uzbekistan that can be easily cheated and also corrupted. Moreover, the quality of some questions in final examination are low. Those are the main reasons of dropping the quality assurance of the education at the universities. I think it may passively be solved if we follow some strategies which are used effectively in foreign universities. In my presentation I will explain  why those issue still exist at our universities and I will present some solution for the problems which I learned during my masters studies at Hong Kong University.

Wendy Coulson

American Councils, ESN Coaches Program; MA, MEd
The question and answer format seems to be the most prevalent discourse pattern in the EFL classroom, and Uzbekistan is no exception. In wanting to ‘cover’ the material in our textbooks, we can sometimes lose sight of the wider purpose of language learning. During this practical workshop, we will examine different interaction patterns and their usual results while looking at ways to expand discourse while meeting our course objectives. This session focuses on the primary and secondary classroom, although the ideas can be applied to all levels.

Nargiza Nuratdinova

Nukus state pedagogical institute
Traditional ways of assessment as testing, exams are good in terms of learning knowledge of students. But in communicative approach we need to think about alternative assessment such as project work, portfolio, self-assessment, observation and others. They can help to build a friendly atmosphere that is good for achieving better results. Young learners have different learning styles and teachers may face with difficulties in assessing the work of students. So that in  this poster presentation we are going to present how  can we  assess them.

Mark Zelman

We will start off the paper by talking a little bit about the psychological aspects of ICL, models, and a platform that it is based on.  Most of what people are familiar with in assessment are based on trait and behavioral motive psychology. This educational measurement paradigm accounts for how most test developers and psychometricians (we wouldn't be far from the truths saying more than 90 %) think about educational assessment, how they design it, and how they build it into policy and instructional decisions. Under this paradigm, the assessment consists of a bunch of self-encapsulated items that the test-takers attempt.  These items have been designed often intuitively by item writers who know a lot about the area to elicit a nugget of evidence that will give a clue about the construct of interest.  Usually, each of those item responses is evaluated to produce an item score-right or wrong.  Those scores are combined into what is traditionally thought of as a test score- most of the time adding item-responses up to the examinee's total sum. Sometimes a little fancier method is used, like item response theory - the scores are added up and then applied a logistic transformation basically. It turned out that this thinking wouldn't get us at the grain size in the ways of thinking that we needed to when we were designing simulation-based ICL assessment and analyzing the results. We had to rethink assessment.  This paper's title -the twilight of the standard educational measurement paradigm- is highlighting this rethinking.   There have been attempts for rethinking for the last 60 years. Yet, what is really made it possible now is that technology ( i.,e faster computers), psychometrics (i.,e  computational psychometrics), mathematics and computer science ( i.,e machine learning), and psychology is here, and thus test developers will create simulations, and they're going to say this is an excellent simulation, so it must be a great assessment. The paper will make an argument that it would probably even be a better assessment if we had some thinking about the nature of the capabilities or activity patterns that are important in a target domain, what do we need to see test-takers doing in what kind of situations in order to give us nuggets of evidence to support claims that we wanted to make.   Of course, some familiar assessments were asking somewhat similar kinds of questions. However, we were be looking more at what was happening at a situative social cognitive perspective level.  It gave us a better basis for knowing how to design and score simulations based ICL tasks as they play out moment by moment. What is happening is from this moment to that moment changes- the situation changes, test-taker is moving to a different cognitive state activity and knowledge patterns, longer-term goals are also involved may be changing from time to time. When assessments are designed in the standard educational measurement paradigm, none of that stuff is looked at. For these innovations to happen, as we mentioned, many things have to be done. For example, we needed to overcome familiar psychometric models' limitations. This work actually has been done when we developed ICL and briefly introduced it in this paper, such as Bayesian graphical models and hidden Markov dynamic Bayes Nets for modeling dynamic learning situations.  At the same time, the paper underlines that statistical modeling is not the only limiting factor on the type and quality of inferences we need to make. Modeling is not the hard part.  The hard part is knowing what goes into those models. In other words, we will be discussing an approach that gave us some possibilities to do what good teachers and good psychologists intuitively knew about and did for probably at least 50 years.  The paper will show how we did it in the technological world, where we clearly can't rely on the magic going on in the expert's heads, picking up on the way some of the things that have learned over the past 100 years, like validity, fairness, characterizing the value of evidence

Madina Djuraeva Baxromovna

Jizzakh State Pedagogical Institute EFL teacher
The traditional form of assessment in the post-secondary course is a mid-term or final or exam. This type of assessment often fails to assess deeper forms of learning. Carefully planned assessments, on the other hand, not only evaluate what students have learned, but can motivate students in their approach to learning, helping them develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and allowing them to assess their own understanding of the course content. This is where alternative assessment or authentic assessment, comes in. Authentic or alternative assessments, meaning an alternative to standard tests and exams, provide a true evaluation of what the student has learned, going beyond acquired knowledge to focus on what the student has actually learned by looking at their application of this knowledge (Indiana University, n.d.). Alternative forms of assessment can allow you to see what student can and cannot do, versus what they do and do not know. They tend to evaluate applied proficiency rather than measuring knowledge (Brigham Young University, n.d.), allowing for problem solving and reflection, rather than merely providing facts as answers to specific questions (Indiana University, n.d.).

Hannah Rothwell and Xenia Mathys

Fergana State University. BS in Economics / School no.5. BM in Music and BA in International Affairs
Writing assignments are an excellent way to assess students’ comprehension of material, however, plagiarism impedes the ability of the teacher to accurately assess the level of information retained by the student.  While copying and claiming others’ ideas is plagiarism, proper referencing of those ideas can demonstrate understanding of material, analytical skills, and academic integrity.  To assess students’ writing for plagiarism, it is important to first understand how to properly summarize, paraphrase, and quote other people’s ideas and work.  This workshop will help teachers better understand differences between summarization, paraphrasing, and quotation.  By understanding these concepts, teachers can better assess students’ writing and knowledge of the material they are being assessed on.  By the end of this workshop, teachers will be equipped with the necessary skills to identify properly referenced ideas when assessing students’ written work.

Eshchanova Gulzira Endirovna

Regional Centre of Retraining and Qualification Upgrading of Public Education Staff of the Republic of Karakalpakstan
Assessing children’s language skills in a fun way with a help of dictations. Dictation is the process of writing down what someone else has said. In my workshop I want to show the effective ways of using dictations. I often use them in my lessons. I use it to introduce a new structure, to present the first paragraph of a text, to revise learned vocabulary, to provide a summary of a reading or listening exercise and to provide practice in different areas of grammar. If dictation is carefully linked to the learned materials, pupils will probably enjoy it.“Picture dictation”, “Spelling dictation” and other types of dictations help to assess learners’ writing, listening, speaking and reading skills and raise motivation.

Dr Victoria Clark

British Council PhD
One of the most challenging aspects for teachers is designing quality tests that accurately and fairly measure student achievement or progress. A lack of formal training for teachers in test design and development often results in teachers being unsure of the quality of their own tests and can even result in poorly designed tests, the negative impact and washback of which is known. Item writing training can support teachers to prepare tests that are valid, reliable and fair. In this workshop, I will focus on what is involved in writing good test items and the challenges, the pitfalls to avoid and the procedures to follow to ensure teacher-made tests are of quality.

Otamurodova Orzigul Musaevna

Master student, Karshi SU; Access teacher
In foreign language learning, reading is likewise a skill that teachers simply expect learners to acquire. Reading, arguably the most essential skill for success in all educational contexts, remains a skill of vital importance as we create assessments of general language ability.

Musaeva Dilsuz Tuychievna

PhD student, Karshi SU; Access teacher
In foreign language learning, reading is likewise a skill that teachers simply expect learners to acquire. Reading, arguably the most essential skill for success in all educational contexts, remains a skill of vital importance as we create assessments of general language ability. With the help of this presentation we try to highlight some objectives of reading skill, namely, designing assessments that target one or several of the modes of performance, ranging from perceptive recognition of forms to extensive reading.

Dildora Bakhriddinova Oktamovna

Jizzakh State Pedagogical Institute, Teacher
Peer evaluation is considered as  a pivotal tool in creating a good rapport among learners and teachers. Peer evaluation is included a formative assessment  and it is one of the best way of achieving teachers’ goal in class. With the help of peer evaluation teachers can identify learners attitude towards their subject; learners’ knowledge; more information to use for the future classes, for the planning lessons, and for the management of learning tasks and students. In peer evaluating learners should follow their teachers’ guidelines.

Abdullaeva Makhprat

Scientific-researcher, Scientific-research Institute for studying problems and determining prospects of Public Education named after A.Avloni
Our country draws a special attention to strengthening learning and teaching foreign languages of our youth targeting at forming conditions and chance for fostering international collaboration and communication, widely and effectively using the advance achievements of the world civilization and the information sources as well as providing their integration into the world mutual society. The Professional knowledge and skills of specialists is a key of success in any field of life. In the Education system, it is closely connected with the quality of teachers’ pedagogical competence. In this presentation we are going to discuss the early results of a new introduced mechanism on strengthening Professional knowledge and skills of foreign language teachers in the Public Education System of Uzbekistan and share ideas concerned future prospects.

Kenneth Myer II

Assessment suffers from a Heisenbergian conundrum: the very act of assessing a students' language production often distorts the language being assessed. In some cases, learners produce target-like forms only when being explicitly assessed, and assessed outcomes are not well correlated with outcomes found outside of overt assessment This talk will explore research from adjacent fields that suggests that overt assessment may be self-defeating. In this exploratory overview, strategies for covert assessment will be discussed, and participants will be asked to play at crafting informal assessments which do not, at first glance, seem to be assessments at all.

Zoe Randall

Bukhara Engineering and Technology Institute, School #15
Teachers will provide students with a prompt and questions. Students will have one minute of individual preparation to respond to the prompt and questions. The class will be divided into pairs, where one partner is a “speaker” (a language producer) and the other partner is a “listener” (an assessor). Students will assess each other using a “rubric” in the form of a questionnaire to evaluate the language producer’s speech for fluency, grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. Students will reverse roles, so that the assessor becomes the language producer and vice versa. In a “debrief” section of the lesson, teachers will ask students to share self-evaluations and then find out how partners assessed each other. Teachers will identify areas of wea

Sarah Chatta

Bukhara State University
Teachers will provide students with a prompt and questions. Students will have one minute of individual preparation to respond to the prompt and questions. The class will be divided into pairs, where one partner is a “speaker” (a language producer) and the other partner is a “listener” (an assessor). Students will assess each other using a “rubric” in the form of a questionnaire to evaluate the language producer’s speech for fluency, grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. Students will reverse roles, so that the assessor becomes the language producer and vice versa. In a “debrief” section of the lesson, teachers will ask students to share self-evaluations and then find out how partners assessed each other. Teachers will identify areas of weakness based on common feedback. Teachers will provide strategies to address those areas of weakness.

Masharipova Feruza

Enhancing learners’ creative and critical thinking skills as mentioned LOTS and HOTS in Blooms taxonomy is one of the key components of today’s teaching context. Increasingly we are in information –based, high- tech society. Learners’ mindset is increasing at a mind – boggling speed. How do we assess our students speaking performance? Through crafted pictures participants formulate thinking questions starting from LOTS and HOTS.

Robert Lowell Dunn

Red Bridge School; Samarkand Davlat Chet Tillar Instituti
“Norming”, or “benchmarking” is a practice used to ensure that students are graded equally and fairly for similar work. It can also help identify potential areas for improvement in assessments. It provides valuable information to teachers and program administrators about strengths and weaknesses of assessments across a program, as well a valuable opportunity for teachers and administrators to reflect on both individual assessments, as well as overall assessment structure in a program. This process is easy to implement and will help standardize outcomes for learners across your program

Emma B

Are your students truly learning the skills you have taught them, or are they good at guessing? Using focused assessments of your students’ understanding can give you important information about their progress toward your learning targets and allow you to create lessons which will help them quickly improve. Many teachers struggle with asking the right questions, both in class and on written tests. So, how can we tell if students have mastered a skill? By carefully connecting your assessment questions to the learning targets of a lesson or unit, you will gain valuable information about your students’ current abilities. In this session, we will look at some targeted assessments and gain familiarity with different question formats, including those which leave room for student choice and creativity, practice connecting learning goals with appropriate assessment questions, and write our own assessments based on a lesson’s targeted skills.

Manneha Qazi

Are your students truly learning the skills you have taught them, or are they good at guessing? Using focused assessments of your students’ understanding can give you important information about their progress toward your learning targets and allow you to create lessons which will help them quickly improve. Many teachers struggle with asking the right questions, both in class and on written tests. So, how can we tell if students have mastered a skill? By carefully connecting your assessment questions to the learning targets of a lesson or unit, you will gain valuable information about your students’ current abilities. In this session, we will look at some targeted assessments and gain familiarity with different question formats, including those which leave room for student choice and creativity, practice connecting learning goals with appropriate assessment questions, and write our own assessments based on a lesson’s targeted skills.

Joshua Gaston

Webster University, M.A. TESOL
According to Hughes (1989), “[good] multiple choice items are notoriously difficult to write.” When multiple choice items are not well-written, the quality of the assessment suffers and the results may not accurately reflect the knowledge of the learners. In this case, stakeholders at all levels do not receive precise depictions of learner progress at the micro or macrolevels. However, there are simple formulas that language instructors and test designers can use to improve the quality of test items they have written. In this workshop, participants will learn how to conduct basic item analyses to ensure the quality of the objective test items they have created.

Jesse Conway

As collaboration and communication in the classroom increases, so do opportunities for students to receive beneficial feedback on their language production from peers and teachers. However, not all students are fully qualified to assess their classmates’ language…yet! With a rubric in hand, a student has a ‘cheat sheet’ that not only simplifies the feedback process for them, but also guides them towards success in their own task completion. In this workshop, attendees will be introduced to different varieties of rubrics, identify situations in which use of student-generated rubrics is appropriate, and work together to apply these concepts to their unique classroom context.

Jared Rodrigues

Using an open-ended visual discussion activity to start lessons allows teachers to immediately engage students in a mixed ability language class. In this workshop you will learn how to help your students activate their prior language and subject knowledge by speaking freely about the lesson topic. In parallel, you will gain access to early formative assessment, giving you necessary information to adjust your lessons and better cater to your students. This is not only a quick assessment of your student’s language ability but also about their level of motivation and frame of mind.

Emily Claris Rodriguez

The instructional variable, “wait time,” otherwise known as “think time,” was first introduced by Mary Budd Rowe in 1972. This is the time that teachers wait between asking a question and allowing students to answer. According to Rowe, the average wait time is only about 1 second. However, she showed that increasing that time to 3 seconds or more enables more students to answer the question, increases the correctness of the answer, and even increases the quality of questions asked by the teacher, among other benefits (Rowe 1972). When students are learning English as a foreign language, increasing wait time can cause students to process the questions, work through mental translations, recall English vocabulary, and gain the confidence to speak. This additional time reveals the students’ knowledge to the teacher and provides more accurate results to formative assessment questions in the classroom.

Shawn Singh

In this presentation, we will address how Google Classroom Fundamentals (GCF) can create a data-driven and objective classroom experience for learners through tracking and reporting assessments. Google Classroom is a learning management system (LMS).  These systems increase student productivity by simplifying and automating assignment grading. Within the capabilities of GCF,  teachers can create assessments with pre-defined rubrics, assessments can be automated (multiple-choice testing), and rubrics provide objective standards for evaluating student work. Teachers then offer real-time, direct feedback for students to check, reevaluate, and improve their comprehension on subject matter. Moreover, using digital assessments saves teachers time in grading and familiarizes students with a digital learning platform. Google Classroom also provides a better medium for critical, real-time feedback, so a quicker turnaround means more learning is happening inside the classroom.

Carolyne Mesa

In this presentation, we will address how Google Classroom Fundamentals (GCF) can create a data-driven and objective classroom experience for learners through tracking and reporting assessments. Google Classroom is a learning management system (LMS).  These systems increase student productivity by simplifying and automating assignment grading. Within the capabilities of GCF,  teachers can create assessments with pre-defined rubrics, assessments can be automated (multiple-choice testing), and rubrics provide objective standards for evaluating student work. Teachers then offer real-time, direct feedback for students to check, reevaluate, and improve their comprehension on subject matter. Moreover, using digital assessments saves teachers time in grading and familiarizes students with a digital learning platform. Google Classroom also provides a better medium for critical, real-time feedback, so a quicker turnaround means more learning is happening inside the classroom.

Carolyn Mitchell

Formative assessment is a vital everyday classroom practice which helps inform teachers of students’ understanding and mastery of skills. Traditional formative assessment often lacks room for creativity and social interaction. Moreover, students realize they’re being examined and respond differently than they would in a more relaxed environment. This workshop focuses specifically on using games as a nontraditional method for student assessment. The benefits of using games as assessment tools will be briefly discussed, but the majority of time will be spent practicing the game “Bananagrams” in small groups, modifying it, then analyzing the efficacy of the modification. A free template for “Bananagrams” will be distributed to workshop attendees for personal use.

Briana Rogers

Briana Rogers is a coach for the English Speaking Nations program. She is based in Qarshi. She has worked as a trainer of trainers and teacher trainer for the last eleven years. She has worked on teacher development programs for the Ministries of Education in Malaysia, Laos and Tunisia. She is very excited to learn more about education in Uzbekistan and work with the teachers here
Assessment is often viewed as something to evaluate what our learners know, and often teachers miss the opportunity to offer learning opportunities. Assessment should not be viewed as a one-way street with the information gathered going only to the teacher. Instead, the information learned from an assessment needs to inform both the teacher and the learner. Giving students feedback that they can learn from is essential to the learning process. This workshop will focus on: what constitutes effective feedback, how to give effective feedback, and how to assist our students with using the feedback we give.

Kendra Staley

Project-Based Learning (PBL) challenges students to critically think about a real-life issue that directly affects them, motivates them to find solutions to this authentic problem, and offers a variety of ways for students to express their ideas on this relevant matter. Through collaborative projects like surveys, anti-cyberbullying policies, and PSA (public service announcement) videos, secondary school students are able to creatively communicate their solutions to this very real concern. This workshop will showcase the steps to implement this PBL with your own students as well as formative assessments (whole class and small group discussions, peer feedback, and teacher feedback on written and oral work). The workshop will conclude with demonstrating rubrics for PBL’s summative assessments (PSA video, anti-cyberbullying policy poster, and persuasive email).

Chris Cowan

M.S. Geography University of Arkansas
Clubs present excellent opportunities to practice their target language outside of the classroom. From the standard "speaking," or "discussion," club to clubs focused on film, culture, or sports, such activities can provide valuable supplemental instruction and practice opportunities to those studying language. With many such endeavors being informal, however, assessment of participants may prove difficult for those organizing, administering, and facilitating club meetings. This presentation will discuss approaches to assessing individual students, groups of students, and the success of clubs overall. It will also examine assessing clubs from the standpoint of sustainability, and discuss approaches which may allow for success in both regards.

Joshua E. Zakharov

Debate has long been considered an invaluable method of language teaching, requiring students to think quickly, critically, analytically, and in a structured and organized way. But how can teachers assess the progress of their students at debate and its constitutive skills, and how can students’ strength at debate be used to assess their progress as English language learners? In this presentation, I will discuss ways to organize classroom debates to make them maximally effective at assessing students’ critical thinking and speaking progress and different criteria by which teachers can judge and evaluate debate (and how teachers can prepare students to judge and assess one another in debates

Umida Khaydarova

Flipped lessons substitute teacher classes with instructional material—often a video—that students watch and interact with at home. They apply what they learned in class through a variety of activities or projects that could once have been homework, with the teacher working as an instructor or guide. The aids include letting students work on their own, to control themselves the input they need to review, and apply concepts in different contexts in class to ensure that they thoroughly comprehend the content. Thus, education tools help to understand the principles underpinning the Flipped Classroom as well as develop the actual technical skills to create Flipped Classroom. The presentation shows how to build the participant's knowledge of the key principles behind the Flipped Class, focus on the Flipped Class problems and possible solutions, and look at the role the Flipped Class plays in fully online and hybrid delivery.

Erkin Mukhammedov

Senior Lecturer, Westminster International University in Tashkent
“Assessment in education can, and indeed should, inform and improve teaching and learning processes and outcomes” (Gordon and Rajagopalan, 2016) [1]. To be able to set effective and sound assessment tasks that can generate learning, teachers should be assessment literate and must know all the underlying principles behind any types of assessment. This article explores the principles of language assessment and their importance by illustrating each one with examples.

Makovskaya Liliya

Senior Lecturer, Global Education Department Westminster International University in Tashkent
Academic writing is an important productive skill to be developed by students enrolled in the language programmes. It is therefore crucial for university lecturers to present key features of writing in academia and assess them appropriately. It is explained that considering the essential aspects of different academic writing genres will help teachers in developing assessment criteria. The article also provides some suggestions to be followed by the university language lecturers.

Alimova Mamura

In order to succeed in demanding job market and life, students should possess 21st century skills (Saleh, 2019). The concept of implementing 21st century skills into the classroom is widely discussed in educational literature. However, applying four C’s of 21st century skills into EFL local assessing techniques leads to challenges and difficulties for EFL teachers. The main focus of the presentation is given to the paradigm shift of assessment from traditional into performance-based assessment. The presenter shares the results of action research conducted with university students and talks about the ways of improving students 21st century skills with the help of performance-based assessment techniques.

Kurbanbaev Kamal

Senior EFL teacher The regional center of Retraining and qualification upgrading of public educational staff of the Republic of Karakalpakstan Nukus, Karakalpakstan
There are different types of assessment and tests in education. All assessment methods during and after training have different purposes. Assessment can be defined as the systematic collection, interpretation and use of training data. This allows teachers to better understand what learners know and what their learning experiences allow them to do, and what their abilities and personal capabilities mean. Assessment is the key to successful teaching and learning. To determine the effectiveness of the learning sequence, teachers need to assess the progress of students in understanding what they want to learn. A test is a “product” that measures a specific behavior or set of goals.

Bazarbaeva Albina

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in philological sciences, associate professor. World Languages University Tashkent, Uzbekistan
A portfolio can provide individual attention to students’ needs. Looking at students’ work all at once can help teachers improve their lessons and include more targeted instruction after analyzing both students’ improvement and problems. It is essential that teachers make the purpose of the portfolio clear to the students and make the entire process engaging and meaningful to enhance the learning experience as it was found that students would like to use the portfolio for other purposes, such as for their professional development. Making the process and the purpose of the portfolio clear could help students learn the skills necessary to compile portfolios that they can use for future career development.

Alicia Bradely

Oral presentations are a great way for students to demonstrate their understanding and attainment of goals and objectives. They allow students to utilize a variety of skills in one activity. However, oral presentations can be challenging for teachers to assess. How do we select the best type of presentation to help our students meet their learning goals? How do we fairly assess students in multi-level classes? How do we keep all students engaged? In this workshop, we will focus on selecting the type of oral presentation that best assesses our students’ learning. We will then explore how teachers can fairly evaluate student presentations and look at ways we can increase engagement by incorporating students in the assessment process.

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